The Anthropocene cuisine

autumn olive goat cheese dip

Goat’s cheese and autumn olive dip and dressing (Source: 3-Foragers)

“We must mine the biodiversity in seed banks to help to overcome food shortages” urges a report published in Nature earlier this month. A very sensible plea this – not least because our entire global food system is supported by a dozen plant species while there are 300,000 other flowering plants that we can potentially use as food source. A missed opportunity? Absolutely.

This fragile food system is also starting to crack along the margins as recent food scandals have hinted at. Horsemeat might arguably be the only healthy ingredient in burgers (!), but when it sneaks into our food system through the backdoor, we are extremely upset. The truth is that the supply chain of food is getting so complex that we can’t quite trace our food properly. But even more fundamental issue is: Why are there adulterants in our food in the first place? Is it because the ‘quality’ of food has to be compromised so as to supply cheap and abundant food – the hallmark of our food system – leading inevitably to overconsumption, food waste and health problems?

I would rather eat the ‘Goat’s cheese and autumn olive dip and dressing’ pictured above than horsemeat-filled beef burgers! Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellate), an Asian native has become invasive in North America. The domestic goat is one of worst ten invasive species – a prolific grazer and browser, which has ravaged the countryside in many European countries for centuries. There is no way we can get rid of all goats overnight, nor can we get rid of plants like autumn olives. What better use for these than to make food out of them? Critiques say that by making food from invasive species, we are only going to increase the demand for them and make the problem worse. But we got to start somewhere when control and eradication measures thus far have not been successful. Making food out of invasives is a mighty good idea!

This is the brave new Anthropocene cuisine. An interesting piece in The Atlantic talks about a growing food movement: “Chefs are serving up invasive species like knotweed and snakehead fish – and diners are enjoying them”. The author of this piece Nancy Matsumoto (health, food, and culture writer based in New York City) argues that this food movement might also be good for the environment. Let’s call it invasivory. Not only is invasivory controlling the spread of invasive species, but it is also diversifying food, perhaps even making it more nutritious. Think of Dandelions, a somewhat annoying weed for gardeners in Europe, but Megan Saynisch in an article in Ecocentric says: “Raw dandelion greens have a crazy amount of vitamin K, necessary for blood coagulation and bone health. The greens are also a great source of vitamins A and C, and a decent source of iron, calcium, vitamin E, potassium and manganese. The leaves even have a little bit of protein.”

The Anthropocene cuisine might be good not only for the environment but also for the health.

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